How long can the press divert the public with minnows while leaving the biggest sharks unmentioned?

Today the Charlotte Observer and the Raleigh News and Observer resumed the telling of a story that was reported in part three years ago. I sent the following email to a number of individuals in August 2007. Three years later, the same people are still running cover for the same politicians. Why does the press focus on low-level gang members who are paid with taxpayer funds to follow orders, but ignore the fact people like Isley and Ransome are permitted (or even required) to function as they did by prominent individuals far more culpable because they’re far more privileged. Remember, the following was written three years ago:

On this one, I almost completely agree with The Charlotte Observer:

“One of the doctors at Dorothea Dix mental hospital, where Mr. Brown has been held for the past 14 years, said not only did the confession not sound like the accused, but he couldn’t even be “trained or coached” to talk that way.
The comments give weight to defense charges that the confession was faked. The state attorney general’s office should probe that and other allegations. If such evidence tampering occurred, those involved should be prosecuted.”

Yes, and those responsible for murder and covering up murder should be publicly exposed and booted from public office. If what the Charlotte Observer printed is true, and in this case, I believe it is, the district attorneys who sat on the case for years are no better than Mike Nifong. In fact, it could be argued that they’re worse because they helped a murderer go free by jailing someone obviously innocent.

But why would you expect the state attorney general’s office to expose the problem? Nifong would not have been exposed if he had not picked on an out-of-state student with the financial ability to expose his dishonesty. Black would still be Speaker if the feds had not caught him in the video poker net. Asking our current state government to expose corruption on the part of those who know how deep it runs is funnier than anything in the comic section. 

How could such a thing happen? Follow the trail of corruption far enough, and you’ll end up right back in Raleigh. A few years ago someone phoned me wanting to turn in one of Senator Plyler’s pals (you can probably guess which one) for serious corruption. At that time, the Union County Sheriff and DA were part of the “machine” so I asked Joe Kiser, since he was a former sheriff, who I could go to with the information. He thought a few minutes and said, “There was one honest guy at the SBI, but they fired him.” Law enforcement didn’t touch the fellow, but the Observer roasted him sufficiently to solve the immediate problem. Yet today, he’s back with more influence than ever and getting positive press from the Observer and the rest of the gang that profits from ties to the Raleigh machine. How can this be?

The Wilmington Riots are old news, but the legacy of dishonesty lives on and is clearly visible in the parts of Union and Anson with the closest ties to the Raleigh machine. If you’d like a brief tour of Union and Anson to see what the people the Observer supports have done and why I view many of them as lower than pond scum, I’ll be happy to drive any of you around and even buy lunch. Maybe I am, as Ed Williams suggested, “nuts” for challenging the insiders investment club than runs North Carolina, but I live in a community kept poor by corrupt government.

Floyd Brown may finally be released, but what about the rest of the people in his community imprisoned by a road policy that denies them access to opportunity for the benefit of influential insiders and an education system that would have done the plantation bosses proud when it comes to keeping the poor “in their place?”

Posted on Wed, Aug. 29, 2007
Justice long denied
With the N.C. Department of Justice stepping in to examine the case, maybe Floyd Brown will finally get what he’s been denied — justice. The Anson County man with an I.Q. of 50 has languished in legal limbo for 14 years, charged with but never tried for a murder based on a confession experts say he couldn’t have made.
Last March, we urged Anson County District Attorney Michael Parker to drop the murder charge. He has refused, saying he believes Mr. Brown is guilty.
The mounting evidence doesn’t support that belief. The investigators on Mr. Brown’s case were sent to prison on federal bribery and racketeering charges for fixing cases. None of the evidence found at the murder scene linked Mr. Brown to the case. Key evidence has been lost.
Most disturbing is this: The case against Mr. Brown hangs on a confession doctors and former teachers of Mr. Brown say he could never have given. Mr. Brown does not know dates, cannot tell time, and does not speak in complete or grammatical sentences. Yet the first sentence of his typed confession, which State Bureau of Investigation agent Mark Isley said was dictated “verbatim” said: “On Friday, July 9th of 1993, my mama woke me up at 6 a.m. in the morning.”
An Observer investigation found more than a dozen instances in the confession of phrasing and words inconsistent with Mr. Brown’s level of competence. Defense attorneys have called the confession fabricated. Affidavits from doctors and Mr. Brown’s former teachers bolster those claims. One of the doctors at Dorothea Dix mental hospital, where Mr. Brown has been held for the past 14 years, said not only did the confession not sound like the accused, but he couldn’t even be “trained or coached” to talk that way.
The comments give weight to defense charges that the confession was faked. The state attorney general’s office should probe that and other allegations. If such evidence tampering occurred, those involved should be prosecuted.
When Anson County officials refused to act, Mr. Brown’s lawyers went to court in Durham County to seek his release. Durham County Superior Court Judge Orlando Hudson has decided there are “appropriate grounds” to examine the case and noted that charges that the confession was fake “appears to have gone un-rebutted by the prosecution.” He set an Oct. 8 hearing to decide if charges should be dismissed.
It’s time for Mr. Brown to go free. The crime involved was heinous. An 80-year-old woman was beaten to death in her home. But plenty of reasonable doubt exists about whether Mr. Brown was the killer. Even the prosecution thinks he should be released: The DA offered a plea agreement to free him if he pled guilty, but Mr. Brown couldn’t accept the offer because his lawyer could not make him understand it.
The state review and the October hearing should lead to what has been sadly lacking in this case — justice. It’s long overdue.

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